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    Blog Posts (24)
    • Stay safe - missing you all

      Hey All I hope you all had a fun and fabulous winter field day! Im missing everyone and wish I could have been there. Also, good luck with coming nor'easter! Although I am enjoying being in warmer climes I do love a good winter and wish I could be there for the snow, skiing and winter camping! Kate

    • This ain't yo mamma's AcuRite

      During my 15 years of work at SUNY Albany, among all the other projects I got to play with, my favorite was working with ASRC (Atmospheric Science Research Center). I made them a 24 foot Mini Maritime Mobil Weather Station. They would take it around the state measuring and recording dozens of air and water parameters adding a time and GPS stamp to every data frame. This is the heart of the system. All custom design and fabrication by me. The top section is the Campbell Scientific Data Acquisition Computer. The middle unit is the Gas Analyzer unit. This bottom unit is custom to route and regulate the gasses to be analyzed. About the only similarity with our AcuRites is the bubble level on top. The whirly gig and tail feathers we use to measure wind direction and velocity just wouldn't cut it. Here they use 3 ultrasonic transmitters and 3 receivers in a pitch - catch configuration. The electronics measures and analyzes the Doppler Shift of the 3 signals and generates 3 signals of data. An Orthogonal output, wind speed in the X, Y and Z axis! Now, we tie that in with a filtered air sample inlet, a thermometer probe, and a flight path turbidity unit. This is my design for an Equillibrator. Water is feed into the pipe on top. It comes out the nozzles as an atomized spray. The water accumulates in the cylinder. At a certain level, the blue float rises, opening up drain ports to keep a constant water level. The grey fittings on the top are for tubes to circulate gasses escaping from the water to the gas analyzer. On to bigger and better... We mount our equipment to the tower on the bow of an ocean going research vessel. After numerous trips around the state in the pontoon boat, they now set off for campaigns to the Caribbean, The North Sea, and the Southern tip of Chile to Seattle. With a TON of data, there is just one final destination. Antarctica!!!! So, here is the plan: Antarctica, even in the summer, is a very hostile environment! So, the closest we can get to these conditions for testing is SUNY's weather station on top of Whiteface, mid winter! This is nothing compared to the Rhime Ice buildups we expect on the cruise. We are going to test various heat tapes, including special insulated and heated tubings. The Weather station's outer wrap around balcony. Control central! (The roof leak can't be addressed until late spring!) Snowmobiles are the only way to get to some of the equipment. If your drive belt starts slipping, STOP! If you don't stop, IT WILL STOP EVENTUALLY!!! This is what is left of their sled when a contractor borrowed it and didn't stop. It took hours to cool off from the fire, in spite of the cold! No slipping drive belts here! Somebody caught the photographer. The guys for the Whiteface trip. The person in the center is a researcher visiting from Ireland, Dr. Brian Ward. The person in the dark jacket is Dr. Scott Miller. He is project leader, all around good guy, and a friend! A lot more info on Scott's project can be found here. Lots of pictures, charts and technical data. http://bloomcruise.blogspot.com/ Enjoy, Jim K2BHM

    • Blow hard?!?

      The Beaufort Wind Force Scale is an extremely easy to use tool to assess weather conditions especially under field conditions. It is a well researched, scientifically based system that is endorsed by the National Weather Service for use by its Weather Spotters due to its extreme versatility under almost any conditions. Likewise many other agencies use it as well. I was trained in this by State of Maine for my Guide training, in multiple Search and Rescue classes, as well as in my US Forest Service Forest Fire Fighter training. US military uses it extensively. Likewise it is still used routinely in international shipping and aviation. It is extremely useful due to its ease of operations even when your batteries died, your wifi is down &/or your anemometer is frozen up. So useful that U.S. Air Force Combat Air Controllers (CAC), still use it to call in Air Traffic Control for complex air support operations for multiple planes and multiple drops of paratroopers and cargo from behind enemy lines. (Sorry guys, but Marine motto of "First In" usually isn't true. CAC's jump solo behind enemy lines up to two weeks before a large operation to call in weather. They make the Go/No Go decision based off field observations from the ground) Granted the Beaufort Scale is not as specific as what new fangled fancy tech can give you, but it is quite versatile and adaptable, and with field ops such as Search and Rescue (SAR) or Forest Fire Fighting rarely does a 2-3 MPH difference matter. Overall patterns and trends make a difference not an individual reading. In field conditions you can get constant "read outs" of conditions as the operation is ongoing just by maintain your normal situational awareness. However as with ANY device it should be calibrated before use. You want to make sure the numbers you are calling in are accurate. In this case calibration means training your eyes to see and your brain to recall what those movements mean. You need to learn how to make the observations accurately. Then you can do wind speed any time anywhere under almost any conditions, even at night! The best way to do this is pick some regular views with a variety of trees and start observing their movements. Yes tress actually move. A LOT! You just probably never had reason to take notice of it before. There are set and predicable ways the tress move depending on the wind speed (i.e. pressure) that is applied to them. Of note different trees will give different readings. Soft woods vs Hard woods obviously have different flexibility and foliage so will respond to wind slightly differently. Thus you need to observe a variety of trees and get used to their responses. It is quite easy, just takes a little time and focused effort. So, first things first, forget the scale and just look at the trees. Look at the smallest branches and twigs, can you see that they are actually swaying back and forth? If not keep watching the same spot for a few minutes, you'll be surprised at the choreography been shown to you! Once you see the very tips move, move up the branch a bit and watch how that moves. It's actually quite different than how the tips do. This is due to a complex combination of biology and physics that we need not go into, just have fun and watch the dance. Next move back farther towards the trunk and see how the bigger branches move in a waltz compared to the line-dance of the branch versus the break-dancing of the twigs. Once you see that trees move in predictable ways, then you can look at the chart below and start to correlate each dance step of the tree to the tempo of the music the wind is playing. Last step of the calibration process is once you can consistently correlate your observations to the Beauford Scale then compare your Beauford Scale readings to your own high tech wind speed gauge and tweak your assessments to make sure they line up. Again tress dance differently. Hardwood trees are usually best to observe, but when you can correlate an evergreen's dance against a hardwood's dance now you are adding a layer of sophistication to can rival the high tech gadgets! And no internet required! Download your own PDF version below

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    • Raspberry Pi

      Raspberry Pi Archive Raspberry Pi Part 1 Pi Intro Raspberry Pi Part 2 Win vs Linux Raspberry Pi Part 3 Permissions Raspberry Pi Part 4 Set up a Pi Raspberry Pi Part 5 Fixed IP Address Raspberry Pi Web Cam Directions K2BHM's Oil Cam Nice Beginners Guide For Setting Up A Pi-Star Hotspot! My Pi-Star Hot Spot Weather with a Slice of Pi Pi-Mometer Raspberry Pi Part 6 OS on a HDD Raspberry Pi Part 7 Misc Notes Raspberry Pi Part 8 Access from Web

    • Home | Mid-Hudson Mornings

      835 on the 805 Mid-Hudson Mornings 50 Mid-Hudson Repeaters Download .XLS File Click here to find an FCC Amateur Radio License Exam Near You Our DMR 'Home' Talk Group 31368 Visit our map Download our RF Contact Matrix RF Contact Matrix Mid-Hudson PDFJune 2 2 A Community of Amateur Radio Enthusiasts At 8:35 am each morning we gather together on the Overlook Mountain Amateur Radio Club repeater (the '805') to 'keep together while staying apart'. Amateur radio is the original social media with no internet required.

    • Forum | Mid-Hudson Mornings

      All Categories Search Participant Forum All participants are welcome to post about their radio hobby, family, fun, other hobbies and .... Sort by: Recent Activity Create New Post 1 2 3 4 5 Comments Likes Views Recent Activity Item option menu Cable Modems – How do they the work? My Ham friends helped me find the answer. Paul AC2UQ · General Discussions 2 0 1h ago 'Twas the Night Before Field Day Paul AC2UQ · Family, fun, hobbies 2 1 14h ago Let it Rain, Let it Rain, Let it Rain – Introducing the Annunciator RG-2021! Paul AC2UQ · Family, fun, hobbies 3 0 20h ago Omarc WeatherNet 12-25 5PM Kenny-K2KRP · General Discussions 0 0 2d ago OMARC Weather Net 12-25 2PM Paul AC2UQ · General Discussions 0 0 2d ago OMARC WeatherNet 12-25 11AM Guy KD2TLF · General Discussions 0 0 2d ago OMARC WeatherNet 12-25 8am Joe - AD2AH · General Discussions 0 1 2d ago OMARC WeatherNet 12-24 9PM Kenny-K2KRP · General Discussions 0 0 3d ago OMARC WeatherNet 12-24 6PM Kenny-K2KRP · General Discussions 0 0 3d ago Amateur Radio and Covid Kenny-K2KRP · General Discussions 0 3 4d ago HYDE PARK, NEW YORK FIRE DEPARTMENT HOLIDAY LIGHT SHOW Paul AC2UQ · Our Mid-Hudson Towns 0 0 6d ago GoFundMe Campaign For Digital Repeater... John Petrocelli · General Discussions 1 1 6d ago OpenSpot 3 with Brandmeister and TGIF Kenny-K2KRP · General Discussions 0 0 7d ago Santa’s Elves at Work in North Pole Annex – New Paltz, New York 12/20/20 Paul AC2UQ · Family, fun, hobbies 0 3 Dec 20 Newly discovered DMR Repeater is on our Map now! Joe - AD2AH · General Discussions 1 3 Dec 19 Poughquag DMR Repeater (BM) Neil Goldstein · HF, VHF, UHF and Digital 0 2 Dec 19 Mid Hudson Valley Fuel Coop Kenny-K2KRP · General Discussions 1 1 Dec 19 Introducing “The Determinator” – Let it Snow…Let it Snow…Let it Snow Paul AC2UQ · Family, fun, hobbies 4 0 Dec 18 OMARC WeatherNet 12-17 7PM Joe - AD2AH · General Discussions 0 1 Dec 18 OMARC WeatherNet 12-17 4PM Jim Albrecht · General Discussions 0 1 Dec 17 1 2 3 4 5 Create New Post

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    Forum Posts (431)
    • Tannersville to Tuxedo via 2-meter Simplex – Can we make it?

      This coming Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, February 22,23 and 24, immediately following the morning “8:35 on the 805” Net we will all have an opportunity to gather information and gain an understanding of our ability to communicate on the 2-meter band without the aid of repeaters or the internet. Whether you will be using a hand held or base station radio simply tune to 146.520 and use the following suggested protocol: 1. Listen for 30 to 60 seconds to see if you can hear any station calling “CQ, CQ, CQ this is [call sign].” 2. If you hear a station attempt to make contact by repeating the call sign of the station sending “CQ” and then providing your own call sign. Log any station you hear as ‘heard’ or ‘contact’. If two stations are able to make contact continue to alternate making “CQ” calls for three to four minutes and log all those ‘heard’ or with whom you make a ‘contact’. 3. If after 60 seconds you do not hear any station go ahead and transmit your own “Is this frequency in use?” call and provide your call sign. If no one identifies themselves as using the frequency try calling “CQ” with your call sign every 30 seconds for three or 4 minutes. That’s it! After 5 minutes or so, you can QSY to the OMARC 805 repeater and join the QSO to share your results and find out who might have heard your transmission even if you did not make contact. Whether or not you join the QSO PLEASE SHARE YOUR RESULTS IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW. We all learn from ‘Nothing Heard’ reports. PLEASE REPORT THE EQUIPMENT AND THE TRANSMITTING POWER YOU USED DURING THE TEST. The map on the left shows only a fraction of all the licensed amateur radio operators based in the Mid-Hudson. The more we can learn about our 2-meter simplex communication capabilities the more robust and resilient will be our 'Plan B' should local repeaters and the internet be unavailable for a period of time. All our welcome to participate!

    • Fulton's Followers

      Back about a decade ago, my neighborhood buddy from Cohoes, Ken, WB2TDG, got me involved in a group called Fulton's Followers. They were making a museum quality display of the inner workings of Robert Fulton's Clermont Steamboat for the Museum at Clermont, NY. They had a model of the entire Clermont vessel, but it was a static display. Pete observed that it was totally lacking as to how the engine works and wanted to create a model that moves and shows how a steam engine works. That begat Fulton's Followers! 4 of us worked on the project, presenting a preliminary design at an event at Clermont for an event We continued on to make a museum quality display for the Clermont Site Museum, presented May 12th, 2011. The display was a combined effort of all four of us. From the left, my buddy Ken, Wb2tdg, Me, David Clark, a retired NASA engineer, and Pete Baker , a retired Rotron design engineer. The original model to the left, and our animated model to the right. The guts of the project with my animation controller. The bottom right is the heart of the controller. A PicAcxe microprocessor board. Now, replaceable with the Raspberry Pi Pico! A fun project with some really great people!!!

    • Winter Field Day 2021 - 13 HF Contacts in 9 minutes (with editing!)

      Great fun during Winter Field Day, January 30-31, 2021. Actual time listening, attempting and making contacts was about 5 hours. Looking forward to Field Day in June and ‘traveling’ the world throughout the year on the amateur radio bands. Terrific hobby.

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